Curating the Internet: Business, leadership, and management micro-summaries for September 14, 2019

1 year ago
(edited)
5 Min Read
1062 Words

business.org has a $1,000 opening for someone to drink coffee; A Steem review of Colorado's Prickly Pines disc golf course; Entercom Systems suffers severe IT damage in an aparent ransomware attack; Using crowdsourcing to reduce the risk of Hollywood movie production; A hotdog couch for people who have money to burn


Fresh Internet Content Daily: Welcome to my little corner of the blockchain

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Whatever gets my attention

Links and micro-summaries from my 1000+ daily headlines. I filter them so you don't have to.


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  1. You Can Get Paid $1000 to Drink Coffee for a Month—As Long as You Avoid Chains - The business.org web site is offering to pay a person $1,000 for a month of drinking coffee and documenting the experience. One condition, though, is that the coffee drinker needs to avoid chains like Starbucks, Dunkin', and Gregorys. Once a candidate is selected, that person will get 25% of the amount "up front" in order to purchase their drinks, and the rest will be paid at the end of the month. According to the article, "Job requirements include visiting at least eight locally owned coffee shops; photographing every cup that's purchased; and recording information like the cost, perks, and inconveniences of going local, all while avoiding brand-name coffee shops. The coffee connoisseur will also be tasked with sharing their experience on social media, and while having a strong social presence is a plus, it's not essential", and here is the application. Of course, a person probably could receive Steem, instead, by posting their coffee review through @tasteem - no application necessary.

  2. STEEM Review of Prickly Pines Disc Golf Course in Elizabeth, Colorado (Holes 1 - 9) - In this Steem post, @hanedane has a description and photos from playing the first nine holes of a Disc Golf Course in Elizabeth, Colorado, Prickly Pines. According to the article, the course is in the desert plains, has a mountainous feeling to it. The holes range in distance from 242 feet to 577 feet, and all except hole 7 are par 3 (hole 7, the 577 foot hole, is par 4.) Look for a description of the back 9 in a future post. (A 10% beneficiary setting has been assigned to this post for @hanedane.)

  3. Entercom computer systems severely damaged in apparent ransomeware attack - Philadelphia based Entercom Systems issued a statement saying that it has experienced trouble with some of its IT systems, and the article cites two anonymous insiders who said the disruption is due to ransomware. The company has not issued any formal communications to describe the source of the outage, though. An internal memo says the damage is severe, adding "shared drives are offline, company email is down, printers connected to the server are unavailable and Internet is working but slowly and with some kinks", and RadioInsight.com is reporting that the company is not paying the $500,000 ransom, but the costs of repair will go well above that amount.

  4. Crowd Sourcing Is Helping Hollywood Reduce the Risk of Movie-Making - Harvard's Hong Luo points out that Hollywood movie-making is a risk intensive activity, movies are expensive, there's no way to pilot test them, and they fail more often than they succeed. In order to mitigate that risk, an annual list of movie recommendations by anonymous Hollywood insiders has emerged. It is known as "the Black List". In a new working paper, Luo and her coauthors look at that list to see if it's actually helping to reduce risk. Although Luo notes that the methodology behind the Black List is fundamentally flawed, she also finds that movies on the black list were more likely to actually be produced, and when produced, they were more likely to be successful. The findings suggest that using a more thoughtfully designed crowdsourcing technique could yield even better odds for successful movie production.

  5. If you have questionable taste and a lot of money, this hot dog couch is for you - I didn't actually read the article, but just click through for the photo of the $7,100 hotdog couch from Neiman Marcus and its subsidiary, Bergdorf Goodman.


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